Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Policies)

v3.21.2
SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Policies)
9 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2021
SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES  
Nature of Operations and Basis of Presentation

Nature of Operations and Basis of Presentation

Cadre Holdings, Inc., D/B/A The Safariland Group (the “Company”, “Cadre”, “we”, “us”, and “our”), a Delaware corporation, began operations on April 12, 2012. The Company, headquartered in Jacksonville, Florida, is a global leader in manufacturing and distributing safety and survivability products and other related products for the law enforcement, first responder and military markets. The business operates through 15 manufacturing plants within the U.S., Mexico, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Lithuania, and sells its products worldwide through its direct sales force, distribution channel and distribution partners, online stores, and third-party resellers.

Principles of Consolidation

Principles of Consolidation

The accompanying consolidated financial statements of the Company have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States ("GAAP") and applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) regarding interim financial reporting, and include the accounts of the Company, its wholly owned subsidiaries, and other entities consolidated as required by GAAP. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for annual audited financial statements. The unaudited interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a basis consistent with the audited consolidated financial statements and include all adjustments, which are normal and recurring in nature, necessary for fair financial statement presentation. These interim consolidated financial statements and notes thereto should be read in conjunction with the Company’s most recently completed annual consolidated financial statements. All adjustments considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. All intercompany transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

Out-of-Period Adjustment

Out-of-Period Adjustment

During the three months ended September 30, 2021, the Company recorded an out-of-period adjustment of $962 within Restructuring and transaction costs related to the three months ended June 30, 2021. This out of period adjustment resulted in a decrease to net loss of $687 for the three months ended September 30, 2021.

This out-of-period adjustment did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated interim financial statements for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, nor was it material to the previously issued interim consolidated financial statements.

Stock Split

Stock Split

In July 2021, the Company effected a 50-for-1 stock split of its common stock and preferred stock. All share and per share information has been retroactively adjusted to reflect the stock split for all periods presented.

Dividend

Dividend

In August 2021, the Company declared and paid a $10,000, or $0.36 per share, dividend to shareholders on record as of August 11, 2021.

Emerging Growth Company

Emerging Growth Company

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”). As such, we are eligible for exemptions from various reporting requirements applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies, including, but not limited to, presenting only two years of audited financial statements, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation, and an exemption from the requirements to obtain a non-binding advisory vote on executive compensation or golden parachute arrangements.

In addition, an emerging growth company can take advantage of an extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards. This provision allows an emerging growth company to delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We have elected to avail ourselves of this provision of the JOBS Act. As a result, we will not be subject to new or revised accounting standards at the same time as other public companies that are not emerging growth companies. Therefore, our consolidated financial statements may not be comparable to those of companies that comply with new or revised accounting pronouncements as of public company effective dates.

Use of Estimates

Use of Estimates

The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from these estimates.

Certain items previously reported in the notes to the consolidated financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the current financial statement presentation.

Fair Value Measurements

Fair Value Measurements

The Company follows the guidance of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. This guidance also establishes the following three-level hierarchy based upon the transparency of inputs to the valuation of an asset or liability on the measurement date:

Level 1:  Observable inputs that reflect unadjusted quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities traded in active markets.

Level 2:  Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly, for substantially the full term of the asset or liability.

Level 3:  Unobservable inputs that reflect assumptions about what market participants would use in pricing assets or liabilities based on the best information available.

The Company’s financial instruments consist principally of cash, accounts receivable, other current assets, accounts payable, accrued liabilities, income tax payable and debt. The carrying amounts of certain of these financial instruments, including cash, accounts receivable, other current assets, accounts payable, accrued liabilities and income tax payable approximate their current fair value due to the relatively short-term nature of these accounts.

The following table presents our fair value hierarchy for those assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis:

September 30, 2021

December 31, 2020

Carrying 

Fair Value

Carrying 

Fair Value

    

amount

    

Level 1

    

Level 2

    

Level 3

    

amount

    

Level 1

    

Level 2

    

Level 3

Assets:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Interest rate swap (Note 5)

$

829

$

$

829

$

$

$

$

$

Liabilities:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Interest rate swap (Note 5)

 

709

 

 

709

 

 

 

 

 

There were no transfers of assets or liabilities between levels during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020.

The carrying value of our long-term debt obligations approximates the fair value, as the long-term debt was entered into recently. The Company classifies its long-term debt within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy.

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

The Company tests goodwill and intangible assets determined to have indefinite useful lives for impairment annually, or more frequently if events or circumstances indicate that assets might be impaired. The Company performs these annual impairment tests as of October 31st each year.

In evaluating goodwill for impairment, qualitative factors are considered to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. Some of these qualitative factors may include macroeconomic conditions, industry and market considerations, a change in financial performance, or entity-specific events. If, through this qualitative assessment, the conclusion is made that it is more likely than not that a reporting unit’s fair value is less than its carrying amount, the Company performs a two-step goodwill impairment test. The first step involves a comparison of the fair value of a reporting unit to its carrying value. If the carrying amount of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value, the second step of the process is performed, which compares the implied value of the reporting unit goodwill with the carrying value of the goodwill of that reporting unit. If the carrying value of the goodwill of a reporting unit exceeds the implied fair value of that goodwill, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to that excess.

The Company determines the fair value of its reporting units based on a combination of the income approach and market approach, weighted based on the circumstances. Both values are discounted using a rate that reflects the Company’s best estimate of the weighted average cost of capital of a market participant and is adjusted for appropriate risk factors.

Revenue Recognition

Revenue Recognition

The Company derives revenue primarily from the sale of physical products. The Company recognizes revenue when a contract exists with a customer that specifies the goods and services to be provided at an agreed upon sales price and when the performance obligation is satisfied by transferring the goods or service to the customer. The performance obligation is considered satisfied when control transfers, which is generally determined when products are shipped or delivered to the customer but could be delayed until the receipt of customer acceptance, depending on the terms of the contract. Sales are made on normal and customary short-term credit terms or upon delivery for point of sale transactions.

The Company enters into contractual arrangements primarily with customers in the form of individual customer orders which specify the goods, quantity, pricing, and associated order terms. The Company has some long-term contracts that may contain research and development performance obligations that are satisfied over time. The Company invoices the customer once the billing milestone is reached and collects under customary short-term credit terms. For long-term contracts, the Company recognizes revenue using the input method based on costs incurred, as this method is an appropriate measure of progress toward the complete satisfaction of the performance obligation. Due to uncertainties inherent in the estimation process, it is possible that estimates of costs to complete a performance obligation will be revised in the near-term. For those performance obligations for which revenue is recognized using a cost-to-cost input method, changes in total estimated costs, and related progress towards complete satisfaction of the performance obligation, are recognized on a cumulative catch-up basis in the period in which the revisions to the estimates are made. When the current estimate of total costs for a performance obligation indicate a loss, a provision for the entire estimated loss on the unsatisfied performance obligation is made in the period in which the loss becomes evident.

At the time of revenue recognition, the Company also provides for estimated sales returns and miscellaneous claims from customers as reductions to revenues. The estimates are based on historical rates of product returns and claims. The Company accrues for such estimated returns and claims with an estimated accrual and associated reduction of revenue. Additionally, the Company records inventory that it expects to be returned as part of inventories, with a corresponding reduction to cost of goods sold.

Charges for shipping and handling fees billed to customers are included in net sales and the corresponding shipping and handling expenses are included in cost of goods sold in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive (loss) income. We consider our costs related to shipping and handling after control over a product has transferred to a customer to be a cost of fulfilling the promise to transfer the product to the customer.

Sales commissions paid to employees as compensation are expensed as incurred for contracts with service periods less than a year. For contracts with service periods greater than a year, these costs are capitalized and amortized over the life of the contract. These costs are recorded in selling, general and administrative expenses in the Company’s consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive (loss) income.

Product Warranty

Product Warranty

Some of the Company’s manufactured products carry limited warranty provisions for defects in quality and workmanship. A warranty reserve is established at the time of sale to cover estimated costs based on the Company’s history of warranty repairs and replacements, and is recorded in cost of goods sold in the Company’s consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive (loss) income.

The following table represents changes in the Company’s accrued warranties and related costs:

Nine months ended September 30,

    

2021

    

2020

Beginning accrued warranty expense

$

1,133

$

2,114

Current period claims

 

(236)

 

(223)

Provision for current period sales

 

256

 

357

Ending accrued warranty expense

$

1,153

$

2,248

Net (loss) Income per Share

Net (loss) Income per Share

Basic income or loss per share is computed by dividing net income by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the periods presented. There were no dilutive instruments outstanding during the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020. The calculation of weighted average shares outstanding and net (loss) income per share are as follows:

Three months ended September 30,

    

Nine months ended September 30,

    

2021

    

2020

    

2021

    

2020

Numerator for basic and diluted earnings per share:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Net (loss) income

$

(5,306)

$

6,447

$

8,373

$

22,673

Denominator:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Weighted average shares outstanding - basic

 

27,483,350

 

27,483,350

 

27,483,350

 

27,483,350

Diluted weighted average shares outstanding

 

27,483,350

 

27,483,350

 

27,483,350

 

27,483,350

Net (loss) income per share:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Basic

$

(0.19)

$

0.23

$

0.30

$

0.82

Diluted

$

(0.19)

$

0.23

$

0.30

$

0.82

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), which is intended to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by requiring the recognition of right-of-use (“ROU”) assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet. In July 2018, the FASB issued additional guidance which provided an additional transition method for adopting the updated guidance. Under the additional transition method, entities may elect to recognize a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings in the year of adoption. In June 2020, the FASB issued additional guidance which extends the effective date of ASU 2016-02 for emerging growth companies to begin in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2022. Early adoption is permitted. The Company plans to adopt this standard as of the effective date and is currently in the process of evaluating the impact of the adoption of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments. ASU 2016-13 includes an impairment model (known as the current expected credit loss model) that is based on expected losses rather than incurred losses. Under the new guidance, an entity recognizes as an allowance its estimate of expected credit losses, which the FASB believes will result in more timely recognition of such losses. The use of forecasted information is intended to incorporate more timely information in the estimate of expected credit loss. In November 2019, the FASB issued additional guidance which extends the effective date of ASU 2016-13 for emerging growth companies to begin in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022. Early adoption is permitted. The Company plans to adopt this standard on January 1, 2023 and is currently in the process of evaluating the impact of the adoption of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes. ASU 2019-12 simplifies the accounting for income taxes by removing certain exceptions to the general principles in Topic 740 and improves consistent application of and simplifies GAAP for other areas of Topic 740 by clarifying existing guidance. For emerging growth companies, this ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, and interim periods within those fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact the adoption of this ASU will have on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

There were no other new accounting standards that the Company expects to have a potential material impact to the financial position or results of operations upon adoption.